Beaded Flower Necklace

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I found this video from Kelly, of Off the Beaded Path, for this Fun Floral Necklace. It requires SuperDuo beads, 11/0s and 8/0s. That’s it! It is fun to make, too.

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Kelly gives the option of making the flower components all the way around, or making the chain-like components and as many or as few of the flowers as you like. I chose to make five flowers, and the rest chain. I made 14 chain components for each side on the red necklace, and wanted it a bit longer so I made 15 on each side for the gold necklace.

The Ingredients:  Black SuperDuo beads, Black and White striped 8/0 beads, and blue 11/0 beads.

The Ingredients: Black SuperDuo beads, Black and White striped 8/0 beads, and blue 11/0 beads.

Making the flowers is easy! String 8 SuperDuos into a circle and add an 8/0 in the center.

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Add an 8/0 between each top hole of all 8 SuperDuos.

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Add 3 11/0s between each 8/0.

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Each flower gets ONE connector, made of 2 11/0s, a SuperDuo, and 2 more 11/0s.

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Flowers are joined together by adding 11/0s to the side of one flower that doesn’t have the connector to the connector of the next flower.

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After all your flowers are joined together it’s time to work on the “chain”!

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The chain is basically a variation of the connectors – very easy and quick. You can even mix it up, like I did here, by using a few 8/0s in place of some of the 11/0s.

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The video shows each step in detail. The whole necklace works up in a few hours!

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flower necklace

Funky Chunky Bead Stash Jewelry!

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They’re BIG! They’re BOLD! They’re COLORFUL! And best of all, they USE UP BEAD STASH BEADS!

wire crochet necklace

I came across some paper beads from when I FIRST started beading. I remember we went camping, and I brought paper, scissors, markers and glue with me…and sat in a tent for an entire day while it rained and made a ton of paper beads. So I remembered seeing these Anthropologie inspired earrings all over Pinterest some time back and got out some wire.

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paper bead earring 4

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I’m not very good with wire. These earrings are pretty big. But they sure are colorful! And I’m not afraid to wear big colorful earrings every now and then!

paper bead earring

A few weeks ago I got an email from Auntie’s Beads touting Karla Kam’s one millionth view on her video for bead crochet. So I gave it a whirl!

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I used wire that was bigger than recommended. Well, that’s all I had on hand. But I did manage to use up a bunch of blue beads, including a few packages of cute lampwork beads that were in the dollar markdown bins at Walmart.

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Aren’t they groovy? Every time I see a bag of lampworks in the markdown bin I can’t resist. Anyway this necklace is REALLY REALLY BIG. I’m not sure if I will ever have the motivation to wear it. Maybe with a white t-shirt and some sort of cardigan. In winter. Maybe.

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Yeah, that’s a big old heavy necklace. But it was fun to crochet with wire and beads. Maybe if I get smaller, thinner wire I would like it better.

Potawatomi Daisy Chain Tutorial

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Daisy Chain beading is easy. Repetitive and easy and it makes such cute little bracelets, or necklaces, or ankle bracelets. Potawatomi daisy chains put a little line of leaves between each daisy. You can make your daisies all the same color, or alternate colors, or even make each one a different color!

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Anyway the Potawatomi stitch is four basic motions, using minimum 3 colored beads: a petal bead, which is the petals of the daisy; a pollen bead, which is the center of the daisy, and leaf beads which are obviously the leaves. In this tutorial I am using green for the leaf beads, silver for the pollen beads, and alternating yellow and orange for the petal beads.

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The first daisy to start off the chain is done differently than the rest of the bracelet:

To Begin:  thread FOUR petal beads and ONE pollen bead

To Begin: thread FOUR petal beads and ONE pollen bead

go back through the first bead strung, moving towards the tail.

go back through the first bead strung, moving towards the tail.

thread TWO more petal beads and go into the LAST petal bead from the previous step (the one right above your pollen bead)

thread TWO more petal beads and go into the LAST petal bead from the previous step (the one right above your pollen bead)

Voila!  The first daisy!

Voila! The first daisy!

The rest of the chain is the same from here on.

Thread a leaf, a petal, and a leaf

Thread a leaf, a petal, and a leaf

Go up through the bead right above the one you are coming out of

Go up through the bead right above the one you are coming out of

Thread a leaf and a petal and go down through the petal bead you just added.

Thread a leaf and a petal and go down through the petal bead you just added.

Pull snug and you will have this!

Pull snug and you will have this!

Add TWO petals and ONE pollen and go down through the petal bead right below you

Add TWO petals and ONE pollen and go down through the petal bead right below you

Lastly, add TWO petal beads and go up through the next PETAL bead up, the one right above the center pollen bead.

Lastly, add TWO petal beads and go up through the next PETAL bead up, the one right above the center pollen bead.


Yay!  second daisy done.

Yay! second daisy done.

Now it is just repeating the pattern:

1 LEAF, 1 PETAL, 1 LEAF
1 LEAF, 1 PETAL
2 PETAL, 1 POLLEN
2 PETAL.

1 LEAF, 1 PETAL, 1 LEAF

1 LEAF, 1 PETAL, 1 LEAF

1 LEAF, 1 PETAL

1 LEAF, 1 PETAL

2 PETAL, 1 POLLEN

2 PETAL, 1 POLLEN

2 PETAL

2 PETAL

Another one done!

Another one done!

yellow and orange daisies, silver pollen, green leaves in 11/0 seeds

yellow and orange daisies, silver pollen, green leaves in 11/0 seeds

So I hope you will try out a simple Potawatomi Daisy Chain, it is my favorite of all the daisy chains and is so easy! Very cute for a summer anklet.

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Serpentine Necklace

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I live with my husband and my 22 year old daughter. My husband is pretty useless in giving me feedback on things I make, mostly because he enthusiastically proclaims “It’s beautiful! So pretty!” about EVERY SINGLE THING I show him. The daughter is good at giving feedback about what 22 year olds like, but unfortunately for me it is usually big chunky pieces that are basically just STRUNG. And right now, I’m not into ‘just strung’. I like to put a little time and effort into things, rather than just simply stringing some beads on a cord. I feel like I’m cheating! If I ever decide to actually try and sell some stuff, it will work in my favor that the pieces that the young girls seem to prefer are the easier, simpler things.

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But to my point! My best gauge of things I make seems to be wearing pieces to work and seeing how many comments I get on it. I work with the public, I see hundreds of people every day. And when I wore the gold serpentine necklace to work last week, boy did I get a lot of comments on it! It does take a bit of time, but it can be done in one night ( my favorite time frame – some time required, but yet still the gratification of a finished piece that same night!). It is also very versatile – you can use any number of combinations of seed beads and 4mm’s.

I used an article entitled “Custom Cool” from the August/September edition of Beadwork magazine which was a serpentine chain by Melinda Barta. I will post the screenshots below of the 2 page spread. The instructions call for 11/0 and 15/0 seed beads, and 4mm beads. I needed a project that was easy to remember and repetitive for a trip I was taking where I needed something to do. But I messed up and brought 8/0’s and 11/0s by mistake, and it came out just as nice, maybe even better! So you can use either 11’s and 15’s, or 8’s and 11’s on this project.

working the second pass of four....

working the second pass of four….

On 6 feet of thread, center 5 11/0’s, half the clasp, 4 more 11/0’s. Cross through another 11/0 and knot the strings together. You will have 3 feet of thread on each string. Let one hang loose! You will be using the other thread to string 4 11/0s and one 4mm until you have the length you need. REMEMBER: this necklace will be bunching up, so you need to make it longer – each set of 4 seeds and one 4mm will make 3/8″ of finished necklace. I used 42 sets to make a 16″ finished piece. Add a stop bead when you reach the end, and move your needle to the other thread. ONE MORE NOTE: Usually instructions call for a certain length of thread and I have a ton left over; in this one I fell short every time so 6 feet is a CONSERVATIVE estimate…you may want to go a bit longer than 6 feet.

Finished passes one and two.

Finished passes one and two.

Now you are going to add a 15/0 between each 11/0 with the second piece of thread. For each set of 4 11/0’s, you will add 3 15/0’s. So go through the 4mm, through the first 11/0, then add a 15, go thru next 11, add a 15, go thru next 11, add a 15, then go thru the last 11, the next 4mm, the first 11 of the next set, and continue. Go all the way down. Time to get ANOTHER 6 feet of thread! Center it through the loop and clasp so that you have two more 3 foot pieces ready to go!

After pass 2 the necklace should start to zig a bit...

After pass 2 the necklace should start to zig a bit…

Pass number 3 - adding more 15's between the 15's that were added in pass 2

Pass number 3 – adding more 15’s between the 15’s that were added in pass 2

Thread number 3 will be adding 4 more 15’s to each set. You should have 4 11/0’s and 3 15/0’s in each set. We will now add 2 15’s between the first and second 15 of the set, and 2 more 15’s between the second and third 15 of the set. It sounds confusing but its really not. Go through the 4mm, the first 11, the first 15. Add two 15’s, and go through the second 15. Add two more 15’s and go through the third 15, the last 11, the next 4mm, and continue. If you look at the diagram on the screenshots below, you will say AHA. So when you finish the third pass, each set will have 4 11’s, and 7 15’s.

another look at pass number 3 - each set should have 4 11/0's and 7 15/0's.

another look at pass number 3 – each set should have 4 11/0’s and 7 15/0’s.

The final pass! Switch your needle to the last 3′ piece of thread. THIS time, the final addition is an 11/0, in a DIFFERENT but complimentary color, between the 2 sets of 15’s that you added last pass.

Last pass - add a different colored 11 between the 2 sets of 15's that you added last pass.

Last pass – add a different colored 11 between the 2 sets of 15’s that you added last pass.

So this time you will go thru the 4mm, thru the first 11, thru the first 15 of pass number 2, thru the first 2 15’s you just added. String your new 11. Then go thru the second set of 15’s you just added, the last 15 from pass 2, the last 11, and the next 4mm. WHEW! Things start getting snug here, but the necklace really should be zig zagging pretty good by now.

another look at pass number four

another look at pass number four

Finally check the length, if you want to add to it you can totally do that now. Otherwise make the other loop and clasp and trim away!

gold serpentine necklace using 8/0's and 11/0's.  And 6mm polymer beads.

gold serpentine necklace using 8/0’s and 11/0’s. And 6mm polymer beads.

So that’s it….I used some 6mm polymer clay beads from Ali Express – 200 polymer beads for under $4 – they are so cute, too. They look hand rolled (slightly imperfect) which adds to their charm, imo.

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And here are the screen shots to the actual article:

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serpentine chain2

These instructions also have an option to make two separate chains, each one a half of the necklace, which you then join together with a pendant or drop in the center. That’s what I am going to try today!

Crysanthemum Cane Polymer Heart Pendant Necklace

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I have SOOO many polymer clay canes in my fridge….I first came across canes on EBay a year or so ago, and I was intrigued. How do they do it? I ordered two and studied them when they came, then set to practicing. My first ones were silly looking indeed. And I still can’t make super detailed ones, or even really good flowers. But I have learned you really can’t mess up an abstract cane.

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So I came upon this tute for a translucent chrysanthemum cane from PC Polyzine and even though I said I am not making any more canes until I use up some of the ones I already have, I made it anyway.

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It was actually too easy, and literally took about five minutes. It’s a strip of white, a strip of pearl, a strip of any color translucent (I used translucent red), and then a bunch of scraps torn into little pieces and pressed all over the stack of strips. Roll it up jellyroll style, and the log is then pierced halfway through eight times with a credit card to distort. And voila! That’s it!

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I made two hearts, as shown in the tutorial, with scrap clay as the centers. I made four beads, too….by covering some wooden beads with slices of cane. And sigh, I still have about 3/4 of the cane left to add to my stash of canes. They have taken over BOTH butter dish spots on my refrigerator door.

ingredients:   silver 11/0 seeds, silver 4mm bicones, pink 6mm crystal rondelles.

ingredients: silver 11/0 seeds, silver 4mm bicones, pink 6mm crystal rondelles.

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I actually wanted to use silver chain to make this necklace, but I can’t find any! Holy Smokes! An excuse to go bead shopping. So I did the next best thing: tiny silver seed beads. I will save the other heart and beads for another necklace later.

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St. Petersburg Tila Bead V-Shaped Necklace

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I found this necklace that was entitled “Sleek in Silver” in a back issue of Beadwork magazine. I ordered FIFTY digital issues a couple of weeks ago when they were running a special for like 30 bucks off if you spend 50. Or something like that, all I know is I spent a bit over twenty dollars and I am ROLLING in digital issues of Beadwork, Step by Step Wire, Bead & Button, etc.

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Anyhoo, this was a St. Petersburg stitch using Tila beads, 8/0 seeds, and 11/0 seeds. I was supposed to have top drilled briolettes for the dangles, but all I could find was some glass leaf beads so I went with them.

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This necklace involved making 31 sets of stitches based around a tila bead, and then rounds 32, 34, and 36 each have a dangle. Times two…..the two straps of the necklace. The straps are then combined with a little triangle of 3-2-1 tila beads with 3 more dangles.

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I had ALOT of fun making this one. I enjoy St. Petersburg stitch, and I especially enjoyed it with the tila beads. It didn’t involve a lot of thought, and no complicated maneuvers….it was a breeze to make. I made screenshots of the three pages of instructions I used, as I am not the most tech savvy person, and my attempted upload to scribd failed.

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And here I am modeling the lovely V shaped St. Petersburg stitch leaf dangle necklace!

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UPDATE: I made a half necklace of the St. Petersburg Tila beads and used some black chain for the rest.

st pete half tila necklace

I ordered some “good” beads from Fusion Beads, including the 6mm Emerald green Tila beads and the 16 mm black Daggers in this necklace. All I can say is wow, it is so nice using higher quality beads than the less expensive ones. Fusion beads sells by the bead, so I only had 50 of these Tilas, thus the idea for the half necklace.

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The only problem I have with this necklace is the daggers do not hang properly. This is the first time I have worked with dagger beads, so I’m not sure if I need to leave more slack when stringing them or what. I may end up taking this apart and re-doing, because those darn daggers stick out all the wrong ways and I have to manually straighten them out – and then walk like a model with a book on my head so they don’t move. Not very practical!

Beaded Bead Necklace

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This is a simple necklace to make, and the color variations are limitless. I ran across this schematic with 3 color variations pictured and it looked so simple that I gave it a go.

All you do is string eight 6/0 seed beads into a circle, and then add on two or three more circles by using 2 beads from the last circle and six new beads, so that you have three or four connected circles of eight beads each. The reason I say to make three OR four circles is because the schematic calls for three, and I accidentally made four, but mine came out perfectly fine anyway. Let me apologize in advance for these very dimly lit, poorly shot photos.

make a chain of three or four circles of eight beads each

make a chain of three or four circles of eight beads each

Add a contrasting colored bead to the center of each circle.

or not....you could also make these one solid color if you wanted to!

or not….you could also make these one solid color if you wanted to!

Join the two ends together by adding two beads, then go thru the first two beads of the chain. Add two more beads and go thru the last two beads of the chain. That makes your last circle of eight, which will give you either four or five total circles that will now be a big holed beaded bead!

join the two ends together and then add a final center bead.

join the two ends together and then add a final center bead.

The original necklace looks like it was strung onto black rubber tubing, which I do not have. I used a thinner black rubber cord. The only beads that I could find on a quick go thru of my stash that had big enough holes for this rubber cord were these turquoise and black striped ones. I’m not sure if I like them with the color wheel colors or not, still deciding.

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All in all, each one of these six beads took about fifteen minutes to make.